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      11-11-2019, 12:40 PM   #52
FlyingLow78
Captain
Italy
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Drives: 2018 M3
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: Isolation

iTrader: (2)

I got fully into track days in 2017 and early 2018, had a crash, took a year off, and am back at it again. I spend a lot of time preparing the car beforehand, since I usually have to drive 3+ hours to whatever track I'm going to and I don't want to bring my whole garage.

I only bleed the brakes if I've boiled them previously. I use ATE fluid and it has been perfect under even the most demanding conditions at Monza. I do oil changes every half interval with BMW oil. Brake pads get inspected and I swap out the anti-rattle hardware for solid aluminum pieces that will tolerate the heat.

Track day insurance is harder to get here in Europe, so I'm more careful. My car is in the upper third of the speed echelon, beaten soundly mostly by Porsches and Ferraris, but vastly ahead of all of the Fiat 500 Abarths running around. Even still, my #1 rule is "No racing. You have to be able to drive home at the end of the day." I've hit a huge coolant spill on the Nurburgring, too, right at the exit of Youtube Corner, so your future is not always in your hands. It was a hard lesson to learn, since the "red mist" is what contributed to my crash. Although fun, I have to approach track days dispassionately and keep the competitive spirit restrained. It's also important to remember that track driving stays at the track. At the end of the day, drive home like grandpa and give your car a break.

Costs:

$300-$500 for track sessions
$300-$1200 for fuel (depending on location)
$200-300 hotel
$100-200 food

So far, brake pads are lasting a long time.