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      04-19-2015, 02:22 AM   #1
evanescent03
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starting with the fresh stuff, cw138 made a video! awesome man!



Disclaimer: I am not a mechanic and i wouldn't even consider myself an expert. I posted this mostly to show where specific parts can be found on the F80 and what tools you'll need so you can be prepared when you start disassembling your car. This is not meant to be a comprehensive guide to learn how to properly lift a car, use a power bleeder, or do any of the tasks that I outline. Do at your own risk, cross reference with other sources around the web and be a sponge for what you see/hear. There are good DIY videos that show how to use a power bleeder. Realize that, if done incorrectly, working on your brakes can cause brake system failure leading to property damage, injury or death. If things in this DIY aren't crystal clear to you, please get professional assistance! Had to say it, i know a lot of you guys know far more than i do, but we gotta watch out for the first-timers! we were all there once (at least..)

This is my first DIY, it's very late, and my computer has crashed 3 times in the middle of this, so please bear with me and make suggestions/corrections where you see fit!

I separated the photos into brake pads and then brake fluid sections. In reality, I did rear brake pads, then rear brake fluid, then front brake pads, then front brake fluid. I could only lift one half or the car at a time because of the lift i was using. The convenient thing is to do the brake pads first on all the corners that you have the wheel off (whether it's one, two, or all four at a time). This prevents you from having to depressurize and repressurize your system because you can't change the pads with the bleeder pressurize (i tried and am embarrassed to admit it).

This is a LONG post with a lot of details here's the overview and is probably enough for most of you.. feel free to read every word i wrote though and hopefully you'll learn something or be able to teach me something!

Pads:
Wheel off, use a small punch to carefully push out the two pins holding the spring and pads in place, spread the pads/pistons apart, remove old pads, slide new pads (that may or may not have anti-squeal compound on them), replace spring & pins (remove pad wear sensor and zip-tie out of the way, or replace it with a new sensor if you felt led to do so). Done. incredibly easy.

Fluid:
Same way you're used to doing it, you'll need 10mm wrench to remove/loosen the panel over the brake fluid reservoir, do normal power bleeder stuff and bleed away, making sure to bleed/flush both the inboard and outboard side of the front calipers. pump the brakes until you have good pressure before driving away!

for someone who's very familiar with doing their own brakes but not having one it on an F80 - that little couple liner may be plenty, if you want/need more details, please read on.

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pskttjp5ba.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top):
Armamentarium:

- 10mm wrench (to remove cover over brake fluid reservoir)
- 11mm wrench (loosens all bleed nipples)
- 17mm socket (wheel lugs)
- breaker bar
- torque wrench
- impact gun for lugs
- a punch (shorter than these is probably better, eBay has one called "Racingbrake Caliper pad pin bolt punch")
- needle nose pliers (to cut zip ties, and to hammer the punches, a hammer would've been better)
- pads (pagid rs29 for me)
- anti-squeal compound (many ask you to apply it to your new pads several/many hours ahead of time so check the day before)
- brake pad spreader (e.g.: 29100 Quick Quad pad spreader, can be found on amazon)
- fluid (DOT 4 for me)
- Motive Power Bleeder (or similar, or a friend to pump/hold the brake pedal down while you open the bleeder nipples .. make sure they don't release the pedal while the nipple valve is open or it will suck air back into the system)
- zip ties (to tie brake pad sensors aside)
- rags/gloves (brakes are filthy, brake fluid is very damaging to painted surfaces, so i hear)
- flashlight (the obvious, also to illuminate the reservoir to monitor the fluid level)
- *not pictured* a hammer for the punches; larger rags to cover engine/car to prevent spillage damage

Above (bottom image):
Get the car (or as many wheels as possible) up off the ground; remove wheel(s)

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...ps7ona2r6s.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): tap pins loose, i nicked the paint so be careful and possibly use something other than a metal punch (plastic/hard rubber?)
(middle): when the pins are part way out, depress the metal spring to relieve tension on the pins and finish removing them [without controlling the spring a little, it can do what springs do best and fly out, damaging your car or your face, so be a little careful with this]
(bottom): you will need to squeeze the pads towards the outside of the car to compress the pistons and make space for removal (and your new pads). there is a special tool for this as well, but i was able to do it by hand. if you can wiggle a pad out, you can also use a broad instrument to pry them away from the rotor, just be careful not to destroy your rotor although it's probably pretty tough (this is one of those "not best practices" things, but seem to work without causing damage). once there is space, the pads very simply slide out.

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pshjvqadvu.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): the passenger rear and driver front have brake wear sensors. ideally you replace these any time you touch them. i keep an eye on pad thickness and therefore have never replaced a sensor and haven't had a problem. carefully separate the sensor from the pad (don't lean the punch against the pad material like i did it'll chip the edge). the length of the sensor for the rear pad doesn't give you much leeway, and as you slide the pad out it kinks the wire right at the sensor which can be damaging; you may want to remove the sensor before removing the pad to prevent damaging the wire connection.
(middle): i zip tied the sensor to itself to create a loop and remove slack, then tied it up to the solid part of the brake line. you could reattach it but i didn't see a point since i'll be swapping pads again before long.
(bottom): to show the detail of how i did it .. probably 100 ways to do this

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pssnexgu7y.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): the only differentiation between the inside & outside, right or left pad (to me) is the little dimple by the "17' .. maybe this is for your own reference so i just picked a way and went with it. they seem identical for all intents and purposes aside from the dimple.

(middle) these are actually the front pads but i wanted to show the backing plate i didn't re-use these because it seems like they are glued on, but it may come out later than these should be transferred. (I haven't noticed any excessive squealing and braking has been fine NOT re-using them) the rears didn't have significant amount of anti-squeal compound.

(bottom) thread the pins back through, holding the metal spring in place may take a little finagling of all the parts to make it happen but for me the best sequence was: top pin all the way through, metal spring in place and then lower pin; be sure the pins protrude the same amount as before you started.

Now you're one!!! with at least that wheel repeat for the other rear wheel. Very few things are different in the front but since I know people love photos and can be afraid of things that are different (myself included):

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pspu9j9c17.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top left): the metal spring is a little different than the rears but is the same principle, the design makes it slightly more tricky but still quite easy. you'll likely want to put the top/bottom pins in part way and thread them through the tabs on the metal spring (that rest on the pins once pins are installed)

(lower left): this is where i tied (using a figure 8) the wear sensor on the front driver's side

(right): all done! but if you still have the fluid to flush/replace then don't put the wheel back on just yet

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...psxrhwriby.jpg[/IMG]

Above: of note: i noticed no differences in inside/outside/left/right for the RS29 pads except that little dimple by the "17'.. the pads were clearly designed using the stocks as a go-by, but the stock pads also had the additional layer/clip/plate on them and a couple other chunks attached i haven't researched what this is all about but hopefully someone will chime in. none of it seems to matter thus far. lastly, i reused anti-squeal from the stock pads (feel free to use fresh stuff) because i forgot to bring my container of the stuff (chasing around a 2 yr old and 10 month old makes you forget the basics .. that's why i would use a list next time!)

FLUID TIME!! Again, i did this throughout due to my lift situation but either of these could be done independently so i wanted to break it apart.

If you don't understand what is going on, do more research until you KNOW you can handle this job and are willing to spend a lot of time and headache trying to fix a problem (air in the lines which will then possibly require towing your car to a shop where they can fix it using ABS activators, etc; brake fluid spraying on your car and destroying the paint; poor performance form the brakes, etc) if you have any reservations, please be careful and/or take your car to someone who can help you

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...ps6986itll.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): locate the triangular plastic covering near the windshield, it has three plastic bolt heads sticking through it and a rivet near the driver's side of the engine bay
(middle): use 10 mm wrench to rotate the bolts and unlock the tray, swivel it on riveted corner out of the way
(bottom) expose the brake fluid reservoir, remove the cap

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...psmhh1qll0.jpg[/IMG]

Above: (left) i made an attempt to remove the filter inside the reservoir this was so i could hopefully siphon off a significant amount of dirty/old fluid without pushing it all the way through the system. i realized i didn't have something to siphon said fluid so I abandoned the idea. you should be able to just grab it an (in a controlled fashion) rip the filter out. i have in other cars but this one seems especially stuck.
(right) i pressurized the tank while it was attached to the reservoir to confirm a closed system (per the instructions ON THE BOTTLE! ) once all seems well sealed, go ahead and put your fluid in. I used 1L. If i wanted to be 100% sure i got EVERYTHING (within natural limitations) replaced, i would've done more. if you end up bleeding more than you need to out the back calipers then you'll run out on the fronts but you'll get better at this as you do it a few times. you can add more fluid part way into the procedure, but you don't want to accidentally run the pressure bleeder ry and start pumping air through the car's fluid reservoir and into the system.. that's where things get ugly (so i hear)

I follow the sequence: passenger rear, driver rear, passenger front, driver front. the idea is you start with the caliper farthest from the brake fluid reservoir and incrementally get closer. if you have right-hand-drive this may be different for you; i'm not sure if the car is mirrored or not...

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pspovpno09.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): locate the bleeder valve/nipple on the back of the rear caliper and pop off the rubber cap (you an probably use your hands, but using a plier or screwdriver can help when they're on pretty tight, just don't bang up the valve or the beautiful caliper paint!)
(bottom): put your 11mm closed end wrench over the nipple (using an open wrench may mean you drop/fumble the wrench which may mean you don't close the valve when your wanted to: potential for big "uh oh"

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...pszofz4iei.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): attach a good bleeder-bottle hose to the nipple and open the valve. **CAUTION** i've read that if you open the valve TOO far it can start sucking air in along the threads. I'm not sure if this makes sense to me, but it does definitely open up the chance for excess fluid to come out and make a mess. so don't' over-do it, just open it until you see some good flow (1/4-1/2 turn maybe?)

(bottom): pay attention as you go along how much you are removing and subtract that amount from what you put in the bottle to start.. that will give you a good estimate (unless there is a leak somewhere) as to how much fluid you have remaining in your pressure bleeder. also, in this style bottle make sure you leave enough room in the top of the bottle for the hose to drain into it when you disconnect from your caliper to prevent spillage. (if you are doing the pump-pump-hold method, this is where you must keep topping off your fluid reservoir, never letting it get empty [i wouldn't even let it get anywhere close to empty])

So now that you've started draining old fluid out, when do you stop? great question and i don't know the BEST answer to it. I stopped after roughly 1/4 of my fluid came through the rear passenger caliper which is when the fluid also looked quite clear (earlier, you could see little flakes an lots of tiny bubbles. i'll periodically close the valve, thump on the caliper a few times with a rubber mallet, my hand, or something else to loosen up bubbles, an re-open the valve to release debris/bubbles that may have been clinging to the walls or in nooks/crannies. As you work your way from caliper to caliper, you'll need to remove less and less fluid before it runs clear. You'll also need to make sure you keep the pressure on the power bleeder up (i stayed 15-20psi, but read the instructions on the bottle of your unit!)

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...psxbukw6i2.jpg[/IMG]

Above: when you make your way to the front, make sure you do the inside AND outside of each brake caliper.

[IMG]http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e4...psm9zjmtkb.jpg[/IMG]

Above (top): (some DIY videos don't show this step, but it's on the bottle) the last step before disconnecting the power bleeder (on my unit) is to tilt it over so the pick-up tube sucks air up, slowly bleed the front driver's side (the closest caliper to the brake fluid reservoir). I put a flashlight on the reservoir so i could easily see the brake fluid level. you bleed the valve as you watch fluid come out in your bleed bottle and the air slowly starts to descend within the brake fluid reservoir, stop when your level is at/below the "max" indicator.

depressurize the system by opening the BOTTLE FIRST (with my unit) and only then remove the other end of the power bleeder form the car's reservoir. reversing this order could make a very big mess. put the lid on the brake fluid reservoir. swing the plastic cover back into place, you'll see a couple tabs that need to be slid in a certain way to make it secure, then put selective pressure on it while you rotate the plastic bolts (x3) to lock it back in place.

(bottom): make sure you pump your brakes a lot when you get in the car, don't just turn the car on and try to drive off it takes a few pumps to pressurize the system that's another one i learned the had way (e46 m3 backed out of the garage and took off down the driveway int our 2013 328i that only had 8k miles on the clockoops!). vacuum your car if it is dirty like mine... and make sure to torque down your wheel lug bolts (102.5 lb/ft (corresponding w/the 14x1.25 bolts) - confirmed by BMW per gsrbri, thanks!)

slowly test your brakes out and be sure to bed them in according to the manufacturer's recommendations.

I hope this helps some people! good luck and be safe!

additional resources:



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Last edited by evanescent03; 06-01-2015 at 10:17 PM..
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      04-19-2015, 03:12 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanescent03 View Post
Disclaimer: I am not a mechanic and i wouldn't even consider myself an expert. .............................
I hope this helps some people! good luck an be safe!
Great write up, what kind of pads did you use?
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      04-19-2015, 03:42 AM   #3
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Good write-up. If you are ok with it, I will make a few tool suggestions to make the job easier, including how to avoid depressurizing the system to change pads.
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      04-19-2015, 08:20 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocWeatherington
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanescent03 View Post
Disclaimer: I am not a mechanic and i wouldn't even consider myself an expert. .............................
I hope this helps some people! good luck an be safe!
Great write up, what kind of pads did you use?
pagid RS29
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      04-19-2015, 08:22 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slavearm
Good write-up. If you are ok with it, I will make a few tool suggestions to make the job easier, including how to avoid depressurizing the system to change pads.
of course! is it the pad spreader tool by chance? give me details & I'd be happy to add it!
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      04-19-2015, 08:27 AM   #6
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on the mobile app I see the photos are cropped down and clocking on it says "photo not found" ( I used photonucket) anyone have a remedy?

thanks!
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      04-19-2015, 09:17 AM   #7
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Nice detailed write up, thanks.

For those without a power bleeder, the old school two man method works also following your same sequence.
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      04-19-2015, 03:10 PM   #8
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Nicely done. Thanks for posting
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      04-19-2015, 04:04 PM   #9
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Great write up... Gravity bleeding also works well if you don't have a power bleeder or extra set of feet, just takes about 2 hours...
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      04-19-2015, 09:06 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanescent03 View Post
pagid RS29
Are these more a track pad or a daily driver, and have you noticed any benefits vs the OEM.
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      04-19-2015, 10:15 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanescent03 View Post
of course! is it the pad spreader tool by chance? give me details & I'd be happy to add it!
29100 Quick Quad Pad Spreader
I use the lisle 29100 Quick Quad pad spreader. You use it per the instructions on the front pads (slide it in then squeeze), then for the rears you turn it sideways and use the side of the plates instead. With this method you do not have to depressurize the system to get the new pads in and saves a good amount of time in my book. If you also plan to change the fluid, it is kinda pointless though.

RacingBreak Caliper Pin Punch
For pin removal, I use this little gem I found on eBay. The small side you use to punch the pins out, then the fat side you use to put it back in. I will say that I did wrap the point where it flares with electrical tape in case I get a little happy with the hammer. So far, no damage to my caliper paint.

A couple of notes on the springs. The fronts are near impossible to put in once you have a pin in. So I typically thread the pin through the spring on the first and then lock it down with the second. On the rears, I would suggest putting the first pin in, then then spring, then the last pin.

Also, on the rear springs, they don't have the tab sticking out that prevents them from flying out and smacking you or your car. When you remove the first pin on the back, be sure to put a little pressure on the spring near the pin you are removing. Trust me, that bugger can hurt and getcha in a hurry if you don't.

On Sensors. The front sensor has plenty of room, but I noticed that the rear is pretty tight. I actually remove the rear sensor before removing the pad to prevent damaging the connector. Might just be mine that is that tight, but I cannot even get the pad out with the sensor attached in the rear.
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      04-20-2015, 01:57 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PriZeFighter13 View Post
Great write up... Gravity bleeding also works well if you don't have a power bleeder or extra set of feet, just takes about 2 hours...
i can't say i know anything about that... i'll look into it though! (but hope that my power bleeder keeps working for me!)


Quote:
Originally Posted by rubber_ducky View Post
Nicely done. Thanks for posting
i hope it helps some people - i've used similar guides for my past cars and it gave me a lot of comfort seeing photos and getting the details. hoping to pass that along!

Quote:
Originally Posted by MaynardZed View Post
Nice detailed write up, thanks.

For those without a power bleeder, the old school two man method works also following your same sequence.
thanks!

Quote:
Originally Posted by slavearm View Post
I use the lisle 29100 Quick Quad pad spreader....
i'll get that incorporated when i get a few minutes, good input! my rear was a little tricky but got it out without doing any damage to the sensor, or so i think...
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      04-20-2015, 02:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DocWeatherington View Post
Are these more a track pad or a daily driver, and have you noticed any benefits vs the OEM.
got 'em for the track. so far i haven't noticed a different with them aside from the notorious 'clunk' sound when changing direction (reverse/forward) as the pads move slightly it seems. they work fine so far, haven't used 'em enough to comment on dust but haven't heard a squeak out of them yet. *edit* day two they started squeaking ...

i'm hoping they don't fade like the stock's would definitely have had an issue (noticed slt fade at a [fast] autox on stock pads)

OEM are fine if you're just daily driving ... there may be some less-dust pads out there that improve that aspect from OEM, but i haven't searched for them because i don't care as much about that. OEM pads seem like a fine pad overall though!

i was a little suprised how much crap was in the brake lines after 6000 miles... dandruff looking flakes and small bubbles (air? water? both? i dunno)
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      04-20-2015, 02:28 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by evanescent03 View Post
got 'em for the track. so far i haven't noticed a different with them aside from the notorious 'clunk' sound when changing direction (reverse/forward) as the pads move slightly it seems. they work fine so far, haven't used 'em enough to comment on dust but haven't heard a squeak out of them yet.

i'm hoping they don't fade like the stock's would definitely have had an issue (noticed slt fade at a [fast] autox on stock pads)

OEM are fine if you're just daily driving ... there may be some less-dust pads out there that improve that aspect from OEM, but i haven't searched for them because i don't care as much about that. OEM pads seem like a fine pad overall though!

i was a little suprised how much crap was in the brake lines after 6000 miles... dandruff looking flakes and small bubbles (air? water? both? i dunno)
Hmm.. little M-seaman perhaps?
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      04-25-2015, 02:41 PM   #15
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Thank you for the DIY

It proved very useful for me before swapping my pads this morning.

The new calipers on the the F8X sure are sweet, makes changing pads a real breeze .

Anyone have a clue on how many time the retaining pins can be re-used?
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      04-25-2015, 03:42 PM   #16
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Is this for track people wanting to change their brakes? Thought we have 4 years free maintenance.
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      04-25-2015, 07:39 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 0-100 ninja real quick
Is this for track people wanting to change their brakes? Thought we have 4 years free maintenance.
it's for anyone wanting a DIY for pads/fluid

for now that's mostly people wanting more high-temp resistant pads/fluid but some people may also want a lower dust pad, etc.
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      04-25-2015, 07:42 PM   #18
evanescent03
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CanAutM3
Thank you for the DIY

It proved very useful for me before swapping my pads this morning.

The new calipers on the the F8X sure are sweet, makes changing pads a real breeze .

Anyone have a clue on how many time the retaining pins can be re-used?
happy to help!!

great question on the spring and not one I've ever considered ... I would imagine they can take a LOT of changes but I would just keep an eye on on them... if they seem like they don't put any friction on the pins and you can easily slide them out, or the pads aren't being held in place of change em... seems like there is very little deformation during the pad change. hopefully someone with a mechanic background will chime in but for me I would think a non-issue for a decade (I'm a dentist tho so take my thoughts with a grain of salt ha!)
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      04-25-2015, 10:20 PM   #19
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Dummy question: if I first siphon all of the old fluid out of the reservoir (and it becomes empty = full of air) and then put on the hose and pressurize the bottle, doesn't the system suck in air from the reservoir by the time new fluid reaches the reservoir through the hose? Common sense tells me you should top up the reservoir with new fluid (by simply pouring) right after siphoning. :
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      04-25-2015, 11:59 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lojs
Dummy question: if I first siphon all of the old fluid out of the reservoir (and it becomes empty = full of air) and then put on the hose and pressurize the bottle, doesn't the system suck in air from the reservoir by the time new fluid reaches the reservoir through the hose? Common sense tells me you should top up the reservoir with new fluid (by simply pouring) right after siphoning. :
*edit* the "expert" on the bavauto doesn't fill the master cylinder/fluid reservoir.. I think since the bottle is pressurized it pushes the fluid into the reservoir but the air is displaced upwards into the tube...if you were to run out of fluid while you are draining/bleeding and there was no more fluid on the top side (of the fluid drops below the master cylinder) then I think that is when you get air entrapment. I thought the same thing as you "am I pushing a reservoir sized air bubble through the system !?&&)??" .. guess not!

I think this is what makes "sense" but not what actually happens .. bc even if you fill up your reservoir, when u connect your hose you would be injecting a hose-worth of air into your system .. I think it just is based on the fluid being heavier so it goes down and the air stays up
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      05-02-2015, 01:29 PM   #21
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anyone know torque specs for wheels & bleed nipples?
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      05-26-2015, 07:13 AM   #22
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Did the brake fluid yesterday following your DIY. Thanks a lot!
I ended up using nearly 2L of fluid for two reasons: I was not sure when the new fluid completely flushed the lines and starts to flow out of the caliper having displaced the old one and I really wanted a full thorough flush as I am changing to racing fluid from stock. I started with the rear right as instructed and the bubbles and flakes kept coming for a looong time, so I flushed nearly 1L only through that caliper. Also I sucked the fluid out of the reservoir and topped it up with new fluid before attaching the pressurized tank. I thought that would do a cleaner flush as the fluid would not mix as much in the reservoir.
I have about 1/3L left in the tank after the procedure. Can I store it in the pressure tank and reuse it later or does the fluid lose its quality once opened and poured out of the original bottle?
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