European Auto Source (EAS)
BMW Garage BMW Meets Register Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Go Back   BMW M3 and BMW M4 Forum > BMW F80 M3 / F82 M4 Technical Topics > Suspension | Brakes | Chassis

Post Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
      06-09-2016, 01:20 AM   #111
lemetier
Plenipotentiary
lemetier's Avatar
1266
Rep
2,297
Posts

Drives: Yes
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Location

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by melvyn View Post
Click on navigation ,then refurbishment

http://www.carbonceramicbrake.com/re...t-service.html
I've responded in other threads regarding SICOM and MCCB Refurbishment. AVOID if you have even just an ounce of common sense. Their refurbishing service is to take a CCM Type Carbon Composite Disc, apply a low fiber siliconized friction layer over the high fiber content support structure, which results in a CCB Type Carbon Composite Disc. MCCB rotors are CCB Type when brand new and cannot be refurbished for any reason. It's not a matter of opinion, and isn't something to play around with. It is physically impossible to refurbish a CCB Type Carbon Ceramic Rotor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CanAutM3 View Post
So far, it seems like it is panning out as some of us have been speculating:

With track use, the CCB seem to wear out pretty fast, almost at the same rate as iron rotors (some reported even faster).

With street only use (even very aggressive), the CCB will likely outlive the car itself.
I so want to re-write the MCCB Technical and Service PDF's so that the piss poor translation stops feeding the confusion, disappointment, and hostility from those who chose MCCB and take the truth as a personal insult.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CanAutM3 View Post
It is difficult to put an exact number of miles. On a street driven car, the CCB will likely outlive the car. On a car that sees the track, it all depends how many track miles it sees relative to street miles.
That's the number one problem. Hell, I can wear out an MCCB rotor in ZERO miles/KM. Stick it in a 500C oven for 30 mins and nothing but a ceramic shell with a ton of little holes will remain. Let it cool then flick it with a finger. It will shatter into pieces. In one of the other threads, I quoted the engineer responsible for MCCB figure of 600C as the initial oxidation point. I now have a document from SGL/BMW that states it's in fact only 500C as there are two different types of fiber used in the chop material. The fibers are recycled from BMW and Boeing manufacturing waste and it is the BMW trimmings that are lower temp.

On a somewhat positive note, Brembo/SGL is releasing oriented long strand CCM direct replacement rotors for BMW MCCB. These will last slightly longer under hard use and can be refurbished to extend the service life. They won't perform as well on the street however without a change in driving style. The calipers will also need to have the Pistons (which are an odd size) upgraded and possibly refinished as the paint is only good for color up to 180C and will begin to delaminate and eventually melt around 210C. I've been playing around with some AP Racing Endurance cooling ducts that do fit the rear calipers but aren't a direct fit on the front for F8x MCCB....yet

Last edited by lemetier; 06-09-2016 at 01:28 AM..
Appreciate 1
paliknight1325.00

      06-09-2016, 08:04 AM   #112
FLOSS M
///M4
FLOSS M's Avatar
United_States
195
Rep
819
Posts

Drives: 2019 M4 Tanzanite Blue
Join Date: May 2008
Location: NJ

iTrader: (1)

If you look around at what most Porsche drivers prefer for the track it is steel brakes. The cost to replace the CC rotors/pads is far greater than the steel counterparts.

I have unintentionally banged the steel rotor many times while swapping tires at the track. If this happens with the ceramic rotor, I probably would have chipped it many times already. Also, the steel allow for an 18 inch wheel which saves on tire costs. Just my $.02
Appreciate 1
      06-09-2016, 10:45 AM   #113
lemetier
Plenipotentiary
lemetier's Avatar
1266
Rep
2,297
Posts

Drives: Yes
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Location

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by FLOSS M
If you look around at what most Porsche drivers prefer for the track it is steel brakes. The cost to replace the CC rotors/pads is far greater than the steel counterparts.

I have unintentionally banged the steel rotor many times while swapping tires at the track. If this happens with the ceramic rotor, I probably would have chipped it many times already. Also, the steel allow for an 18 inch wheel which saves on tire costs. Just my $.02
Not only that, but a well designed metallic system can perform better than a Performance Street Carbon Ceramic System.

Take a look at the Pagid Friction graphs. The RSL1 has far more deceleration ability than the RSC1 and RSC3 MCCB compatible pads.
Attached Images
  
__________________
Appreciate 1
      06-17-2016, 01:26 PM   #114
d k
Private First Class
United_States
32
Rep
175
Posts

Drives: BMWless for few weeks
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: SoCal

iTrader: (0)

Does anyone know how much it costs to replace rotors?

Would it be conceivable to replace the ceramic rotors with iron ones for track use, ore are the piston sizes specific to ceramic?
Appreciate 0
      06-17-2016, 01:30 PM   #115
d k
Private First Class
United_States
32
Rep
175
Posts

Drives: BMWless for few weeks
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: SoCal

iTrader: (0)

Completely true!

And, the cabon beakes brake differently too.
Less initial bite and then much more when theyre really hot.

I like steel bcz Im old school and thats what Im used to...



Quote:
Originally Posted by FLOSS M View Post
If you look around at what most Porsche drivers prefer for the track it is steel brakes. The cost to replace the CC rotors/pads is far greater than the steel counterparts.

I have unintentionally banged the steel rotor many times while swapping tires at the track. If this happens with the ceramic rotor, I probably would have chipped it many times already. Also, the steel allow for an 18 inch wheel which saves on tire costs. Just my $.02
Appreciate 0
      06-17-2016, 01:54 PM   #116
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by karussell View Post
...its way more pain in the ass to keep measuring them for thickness and inspecting for rock chips.
For someone who claims to know so much about the pros and cons of CCB rotors - How is it you don't know that YOU DON'T MEASURE CCB ROTOR THICKNESS to determine if they are worn out? (You weigh them - they don't actually get any thinner - the carbon burns out from inside the matrix...)
Appreciate 2
      08-25-2017, 10:37 AM   #117
killerbrakes
Registered
0
Rep
4
Posts

Drives: M3 E92
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: Bucharest, Romania

iTrader: (0)

For BMW CCB rotors yes, but for some Audi discs you have to measure the thickness of the discs

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
For someone who claims to know so much about the pros and cons of CCB rotors - How is it you don't know that YOU DON'T MEASURE CCB ROTOR THICKNESS to determine if they are worn out? (You weigh them - they don't actually get any thinner - the carbon burns out from inside the matrix...)
Appreciate 0
      08-28-2017, 10:40 AM   #118
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by killerbrakes View Post
For BMW CCB rotors yes, but for some Audi discs you have to measure the thickness of the discs
I'm gonna have to call you on that. I don't know of ANY CCB rotor that is checked via its thickness. CCB rotors don't wear down, the carbon matrix in the material gets burned away from the inside the structure itself.

AFAIK: You have to weigh them unless you have a Carboteq instrument. The Carboteq instrument is expensive ($6500) but it is the definitive method to check the rotors and you don't have to take them off the car. I know both BMW and Porsche stamp their rotors with the same Values the Carboteq is reading. Weighing the rotors is the next best way to check the rotors if you don't have access to a Carboteq. I wouldn't know any reason why Audi would be any different then Porsche...

So, please enlighten us with a reference that indicates that the Audio CCB rotors get measured. I'ld like to see and learn from that! What are the max/min values for measuring thickness on Audi CCB rotors?
Appreciate 0
      08-28-2017, 07:37 PM   #119
lemetier
Plenipotentiary
lemetier's Avatar
1266
Rep
2,297
Posts

Drives: Yes
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Location

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by killerbrakes View Post
For BMW CCB rotors yes, but for some Audi discs you have to measure the thickness of the discs
I'm gonna have to call you on that. I don't know of ANY CCB rotor that is checked via its thickness. CCB rotors don't wear down, the carbon matrix in the material gets burned away from the inside the structure itself.

AFAIK: You have to weigh them unless you have a Carboteq instrument. The Carboteq instrument is expensive ($6500) but it is the definitive method to check the rotors and you don't have to take them off the car. I know both BMW and Porsche stamp their rotors with the same Values the Carboteq is reading. Weighing the rotors is the next best way to check the rotors if you don't have access to a Carboteq. I wouldn't know any reason why Audi would be any different then Porsche...

So, please enlighten us with a reference that indicates that the Audio CCB rotors get measured. I'ld like to see and learn from that! What are the max/min values for measuring thickness on Audi CCB rotors?
CFRC type do physically wear down and are measured by thickness and not weight.
__________________
Appreciate 1
CanAutM310796.00

      08-29-2017, 03:09 PM   #120
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemetier View Post
CFRC type do physically wear down and are measured by thickness and not weight.
You mean CFRC Formula 1 and Aircraft brakes? I was unaware that Audi sells those on their cars.
Appreciate 0
      08-29-2017, 03:49 PM   #121
lemetier
Plenipotentiary
lemetier's Avatar
1266
Rep
2,297
Posts

Drives: Yes
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Location

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemetier View Post
CFRC type do physically wear down and are measured by thickness and not weight.
You mean CFRC Formula 1 and Aircraft brakes? I was unaware that Audi sells those on their cars.
CFRC has a few different sub types. F1 and certain Aviation applications are Carbon-Carbon. The discs on my plane are only similar to one car in the group stable (plane has no pads but uses multiple discs in compression)

The Audi discs being referred to are these which are one of the CCM variants.

P.S.

Did you ever read my PM regarding the updated TIS F8x brake documentation?
Attached Images
 
__________________
Appreciate 0
      09-15-2017, 11:08 AM   #122
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by lemetier View Post
...Did you ever read my PM regarding the updated TIS F8x brake documentation?
What PM? I don't see any PM from you...
Appreciate 0
      09-16-2017, 02:49 AM   #123
lemetier
Plenipotentiary
lemetier's Avatar
1266
Rep
2,297
Posts

Drives: Yes
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Location

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemetier View Post
...Did you ever read my PM regarding the updated TIS F8x brake documentation?
What PM? I don't see any PM from you...
This was months ago. The docs have been updated and a supplemental track use assessment added as well.
__________________
Appreciate 0
      09-16-2017, 07:05 AM   #124
CanAutM3
Lieutenant General
CanAutM3's Avatar
Canada
10796
Rep
16,670
Posts

Drives: 2019 M4cs
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Montreal

iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2019 BMW M4cs  [0.00]
2018 Audi RS3  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by lemetier View Post
This was months ago. The docs have been updated and a supplemental track use assessment added as well.
Can you share them on the forum?
__________________
///M4cs 2019 F82 Lime Rock Grey
MPE / CF Mirror caps / MP-HAS / GC Camber plates
Appreciate 0
      09-16-2017, 09:52 PM   #125
Pyrat 2
Colonel
Pyrat 2's Avatar
United_States
1234
Rep
2,528
Posts

Drives: Rapidly from A to B
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Illinois

iTrader: (2)

Garage List
2020 BMW X1  [0.00]
2016 Porsche GT4  [0.00]
Front rotor for one non CCB is 565 at ecs and 3600 for the ccb equivalent. Do the math. If you plan on tracking the car you're better off financially without the ccb since it's unlikely that the ccb rotor will last longer than 7 non ccb rotors. If you are street only you are also better off financially without since it's unlikely that you'll have to replace your rotors enough times to offset the $8150 cost of the option. Bottom line is that they are great technology but at current price points hard to justify other than that they bring lower unsprung weight.

As an aside, my buddy with a Porsche and factory ccb replaced them with non ccb as he tracks his car a lot and couldn't rationalize the cost.
__________________
2016 M2, 2014 X1, 2013 135is, 2006 330i, 2003 323 Ci, 2001 330i, 1999 M3 (RIP), 1996 318is, some non-BMWs
Appreciate 1
Dackelone9308.00

      09-19-2017, 11:47 AM   #126
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyrat 2 View Post
Front rotor for one non CCB is 565 at ecs and 3600 for the ccb equivalent. Do the math. If you plan on tracking the car you're better off financially without the ccb since it's unlikely that the ccb rotor will last longer than 7 non ccb rotors. If you are street only you are also better off financially without since it's unlikely that you'll have to replace your rotors enough times to offset the $8150 cost of the option. Bottom line is that they are great technology but at current price points hard to justify other than that they bring lower unsprung weight.

As an aside, my buddy with a Porsche and factory ccb replaced them with non ccb as he tracks his car a lot and couldn't rationalize the cost.
Well...

I ran the CCB's on the track for one season. I went through two sets of front pads, one set of rears and a full set of rotors. My yearly expense was over $12K all said and done... My track has three locations each lap where its necessary to brake down from over 100-130 mph to 30-40 mph for some pretty demanding corners. So its pretty hard on brakes.

HOWEVER!

This year I tried the RacingBrake CCB replacement kit which swaps out the CCB rotor with an iron rotor and includes "Track" pads. This kit is "advertised" to allow swapping out the CCB Rotors and Pads while maintaining the original calipers.

Complete and Total Failure! I burned through the front set of "TRACK" pads in less than a day and a half at the track (about 180 miles). The pads actually went metal-on-metal with the rotors and the car departed the track. I sent all the stuff back to RB and had to go to Amex to get a full refund on the kit. Maybe their rotors were OK but their pads were crap. Brake pads should last more than a day at the track.

I went back to the CCB's... They won't be any more expensive than changing out the RB pads every single track day all season long... (Or as much as a PITA...) CCB's are expensive but at least they are reliable!

The M3/M4 is a pretty heavy car and front brake cooling is a real challenge. INd is going to work with Fall Line this winter to see if they can design a proper brake cooling kit for the car (one which does NOT use CF for brake shields). The other challenge is getting enough air to the front brakes and I'm told (by a German BMW Engineer) that you can't really move enough air through the coolers in the front fender wells - you need dedicated scoops. I've asked if they could make some easily detachable, very thin scoops for mounting under the front lip which could be removed when NOT at the track (for clearance).

I'm also planning to mount an AP brake kit this winter to see how well it performs/lasts.

However, the CCB brakes have been the best solution I've found so far!
Appreciate 0
      09-19-2017, 09:06 PM   #127
Pyrat 2
Colonel
Pyrat 2's Avatar
United_States
1234
Rep
2,528
Posts

Drives: Rapidly from A to B
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Illinois

iTrader: (2)

Garage List
2020 BMW X1  [0.00]
2016 Porsche GT4  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
Well...

I ran the CCB's on the track for one season. I went through two sets of front pads, one set of rears and a full set of rotors. My yearly expense was over $12K all said and done... My track has three locations each lap where its necessary to brake down from over 100-130 mph to 30-40 mph for some pretty demanding corners. So its pretty hard on brakes.

HOWEVER!

This year I tried the RacingBrake CCB replacement kit which swaps out the CCB rotor with an iron rotor and includes "Track" pads. This kit is "advertised" to allow swapping out the CCB Rotors and Pads while maintaining the original calipers.

Complete and Total Failure! I burned through the front set of "TRACK" pads in less than a day and a half at the track (about 180 miles). The pads actually went metal-on-metal with the rotors and the car departed the track. I sent all the stuff back to RB and had to go to Amex to get a full refund on the kit. Maybe their rotors were OK but their pads were crap. Brake pads should last more than a day at the track.

I went back to the CCB's... They won't be any more expensive than changing out the RB pads every single track day all season long... (Or as much as a PITA...) CCB's are expensive but at least they are reliable!

The M3/M4 is a pretty heavy car and front brake cooling is a real challenge. INd is going to work with Fall Line this winter to see if they can design a proper brake cooling kit for the car (one which does NOT use CF for brake shields). The other challenge is getting enough air to the front brakes and I'm told (by a German BMW Engineer) that you can't really move enough air through the coolers in the front fender wells - you need dedicated scoops. I've asked if they could make some easily detachable, very thin scoops for mounting under the front lip which could be removed when NOT at the track (for clearance).

I'm also planning to mount an AP brake kit this winter to see how well it performs/lasts.

However, the CCB brakes have been the best solution I've found so far!
I don't know anyone that is running RB pads and am not sure why I would make a rotor decision based upon pad wear. Lots of good pads out there that will last more than a day. I'm running Carbotechs but others running Hawk. I have an M2 and not an M4 and haven't researched pads that fit the CCB caliper. The non CCB pads are identical pad size between the M4 and the M2.

The nice thing about Carbotech is they will put any compound on any size backing plate. You can order exactly what you want at no extra cost. So if the CCB pad size that fits the stock caliper does not have many off the shelf alternatives from Hawk or others, then you can go to Carbotech and have a set made. My rear pads are about 50% worn after 11 track days - XP8. The fronts are getting about 7 days per set - XP10.

In any event glad the CCBs are working out for you. Maybe we'll run into each other at Road America.
Appreciate 0
      09-20-2017, 10:26 AM   #128
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pyrat 2 View Post
I don't know anyone that is running RB pads and am not sure why I would make a rotor decision based upon pad wear. Lots of good pads out there that will last more than a day. I'm running Carbotechs but others running Hawk. I have an M2 and not an M4 and haven't researched pads that fit the CCB caliper. The non CCB pads are identical pad size between the M4 and the M2.

The nice thing about Carbotech is they will put any compound on any size backing plate. You can order exactly what you want at no extra cost. So if the CCB pad size that fits the stock caliper does not have many off the shelf alternatives from Hawk or others, then you can go to Carbotech and have a set made. My rear pads are about 50% worn after 11 track days - XP8. The fronts are getting about 7 days per set - XP10.

In any event glad the CCBs are working out for you. Maybe we'll run into each other at Road America.
I agree about Rotors vs Pads - but the RB kit was sold as a complete kit - and I specifically waited 6 weeks for them to backorder the "Track" pads. (Who the heck is replacing their CCB's for use with "street" pads anyway?) So when the "kit" failed, the whole "kit" went back. They told me I could try and use different pads from another vendor but I fully expected they should have that all sorted out already. We are not talking about subtle differences to be gained by switching to someone elses pads. We are talking about their "track" pads failing in less than a day-and-a-half! I don't want to have to be experimenting with different pads in order to get someone elses kit to be marginally acceptable. The promise was that it would work and it failed to deliver.

The RB kit was supposed to be convenient and affordable because it let you use the existing CCB calipers. The problem is finding ANY metallic pads to fit a CCB caliper - so that sort of marries you to the RB pads if you use their kit. (However, I was told that the F8X CCB calipers can use pads for 2016 M5 std calipers on the front and 2010 Audi R8's on the rear but after the utter failure of the RB kit I was in no mood to start any experimentation...)

The other problem with the RB kit (pads specifically IMHO) is that the circumference of the "holes" in the brake pad backing plate crossed directly under the circumference of 2 of the 3 pistons on the front calipers. This means that fully half the circumference on 2 of the 3 pistons was pressing down over an area on the pads with no metal backing plate underneath. In fact, after removing these day-old pads, that went metal-on-metal, it was easy to see that the backing plates actually bent and twisted in these specific areas as might be expected.

In any case - I was done with this "solution"....

So, yeah, I'm going to try a proper AP kit when the car is pulled off the track for the season and see how that goes. I REALLY, REALLY, like the CCB's on the track. They have great initial bite, completely linear modulation, and virtually no fade. But they are expensive! At some point, however, it becomes necessary to ask how much am I willing to spend, and how much time am I willing to invest, in finding a less expensive comparable solution?

Save money no matter what it costs? ;-)

Let me know if you ever get down to AutoBahn CC!
Appreciate 0
      09-20-2017, 07:35 PM   #129
Pyrat 2
Colonel
Pyrat 2's Avatar
United_States
1234
Rep
2,528
Posts

Drives: Rapidly from A to B
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Illinois

iTrader: (2)

Garage List
2020 BMW X1  [0.00]
2016 Porsche GT4  [0.00]
I'm at Autobahn CC too! Next event for me this year is Road Atlanta in November.
__________________
2016 M2, 2014 X1, 2013 135is, 2006 330i, 2003 323 Ci, 2001 330i, 1999 M3 (RIP), 1996 318is, some non-BMWs
Appreciate 0
      10-02-2017, 02:04 PM   #130
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

BTW - Here are some photos of the major RacingBrake CCB Retrofit Kit Failure!

This is what happens when you package substandard pads with a kit. The folks at RB seem to think its fine to put void space (a hole) under a portion of the contact area for the caliper piston rims. The CCB Caliper piston rims land right over a couple of large holes in their backing plates.

Not only did their brake pads completely fail in just over a single track day and send my car into the weeds, but you can see how the backing plate buckled right where the holes were.

It should be noted that they would not give me a full refund for this piece of crap (I had to go through Amex), but I also found out this weekend that it also ruined my stock CCB rotors! (Another $3K!).

I was seeing some very uneven wear in the front pads and when I pulled the pads to replace them, this is what I saw. The piston you see in the picture mushroomed where the limited contact area was and then left a tooth where the void space was. Not only did this ruin the pistons, but it also ovated the piston bore in the caliper as the pressure was not evenly balanced over the rim of the piston.

Who designs crap like this? Am I the only one who thinks you should have a solid contact surface below the ENTIRE Circumference of your caliper pistons? (Apparently not, as the BMW CCB pads don't have this issue...)_

This kit was crap! Buyer beware!
Attached Images
   
Appreciate 0
      10-02-2017, 03:53 PM   #131
CanAutM3
Lieutenant General
CanAutM3's Avatar
Canada
10796
Rep
16,670
Posts

Drives: 2019 M4cs
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Montreal

iTrader: (0)

Garage List
2019 BMW M4cs  [0.00]
2018 Audi RS3  [0.00]
Quote:
Originally Posted by evanevery View Post
BTW - Here are some photos of the major RacingBrake CCB Retrofit Kit Failure!

This is what happens when you package substandard pads with a kit. The folks at RB seem to think its fine to put void space (a hole) under a portion of the contact area for the caliper piston rims. The CCB Caliper piston rims land right over a couple of large holes in their backing plates.

Not only did their brake pads completely fail in just over a single track day and send my car into the weeds, but you can see how the backing plate buckled right where the holes were.

It should be noted that they would not give me a full refund for this piece of crap (I had to go through Amex), but I also found out this weekend that it also ruined my stock CCB rotors! (Another $3K!).

I was seeing some very uneven wear in the front pads and when I pulled the pads to replace them, this is what I saw. The piston you see in the picture mushroomed where the limited contact area was and then left a tooth where the void space was. Not only did this ruin the pistons, but it also ovated the piston bore in the caliper as the pressure was not evenly balanced over the rim of the piston.

Who designs crap like this? Am I the only one who thinks you should have a solid contact surface below the ENTIRE Circumference of your caliper pistons? (Apparently not, as the BMW CCB pads don't have this issue...)_

This kit was crap! Buyer beware!
Thanks for sharing this info and your findings.

It really seems like this kit is poorly engineered .
__________________
///M4cs 2019 F82 Lime Rock Grey
MPE / CF Mirror caps / MP-HAS / GC Camber plates
Appreciate 0
      10-02-2017, 06:07 PM   #132
evanevery
Lieutenant Colonel
evanevery's Avatar
939
Rep
1,657
Posts

Drives: i8 Roadster, M4, Tesla MX
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Wisconsin

iTrader: (0)

Yup! No doubt about it! Trash! Who "designs" brake pads like that? ...and they only last ONE full track day before the pads completely wore away. (I actually waited an extra 6 weeks for their "Track" pads!)

(I have LOTS of photos of their failed kit if anyone needs more evidence!)

RacingBrake wouldn't even refund the full price of their kit! I guess there was a little wear and tear on their rotors (No kidding!). Luckily Amex covered the balance of the original kit cost. But now I'm out the cost of the two CCB rotors that their kit effectively destroyed. I think that's about another $3000 out of pocket for me...

Lousy Product, Bad Company!

Anyway, I'm now onto a full set of Front/Rear Essex/AP Radi-CAL Brake Rotors/Calipers/Pads. All that should be here in a couple of weeks when I get back in Country.

Once I get the AP kits installed, I'll get on the bench replacing/rebuilding my OEM CCB Calipers... I know I'm going to need at least one new caliper, maybe two...
Appreciate 0
Post Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:25 AM.




f80post
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
1Addicts.com, BIMMERPOST.com, E90Post.com, F30Post.com, M3Post.com, ZPost.com, 5Post.com, 6Post.com, 7Post.com, XBimmers.com logo and trademark are properties of BIMMERPOST